New: Save your favorite arias, videos and singers!
Tell me more - Check it later - Not interested

De l'enfer qui vient émousser

Opera details:

Opera title:

Faust

Composer:

Charles Gounod

Language:

French

Synopsis:

Faust Synopsis

Libretto:

Faust Libretto

Translation(s):

English Deutsch

Scene details:

Type:

Not entered yet.

Role(s):

Méphistophélès / Valentin / Siébel / Doctor Faust

Voice(s):

Bass-Baritone / Baritone / Mezzo-Soprano or Soprano / Tenor

Act:

2.07a

Previous scene: Singulier personnage
Next scene: Puisque tu brises le fer

Charles Gounod – FAUST – Choeur des épées: ‘De l'enfer qui vient émousser nos armes’

Singer(s): Liliane Berton Ernest Blanc

FAUST
Opéra en 5 actes
Composer: Charles Gounod (1818–1893)
Libretto : Jules Barbier & Michael Carré, after Goethe’s Faust, part 1 (1808)
First performed : Théâtre Lyrique (boulevard du Temple), Paris, 19 March 1859

SETTING: Germany, 16th century

PLOT: The philosopher Faust sells his soul to Méphistophèles in exchange for youth. Faust seduces and then abandons Marguerite, who gives birth to an illegitimate child. He then murders her brother, the soldier Valentin, who curses Marguerite with his dying breath. Marguerite goes mad and kills her child; Faust and Méphistophèles go to the prison to rescue her, but she rejects them. She dies and her soul rises up to heaven.

‘Faust’ was one of the most successful operas of the nineteenth century. Like Berlioz ('La damnation de Faust', 1846: youtube.com/watch?v=0-x-9WzLS7Q&list=PLoB7Fd8EvhHagG5GFHsyUz60HRHvdsPla) before him, Gounod read Faust as a young man, as a 20-year-old Prix de Rome student, and dreamt of composing music for it. (Goethe himself had wanted Mozart or Meyerbeer to set it to music.)

It was surprisingly unsuccessful when it was first performed; it was found too learned and not tuneful enough. The problem was that Gounod’s music was in a different style from French grand opéra to which audiences were used; it was an early opéra lyrique. Berlioz, however, admired the work, going so far as to use the word ‘masterpiece’. Reyer considered it ‘among the most beautiful works of the time; a work in which inspiration and beauties of the first order erase very light imperfections’.

The audience did not embrace ‘Faust’ until the revised version of 1862. From that time, Gounod was seen as France’s leading opera composer. Its 500th Parisian performance took place in 1887, its 1,500th in 1912 and its 2,000th in 1934.

Chœur des épées : ‘De l’enfer qui vient émousser nos armes’
Méphistophèles has cast a spell that broke Valentin and his soldiers’ swords. They make the sign of the cross with the pieces to ward off the devil.

Valentin (baritone): Ernest Blanc
Siébel (mezzo-soprano, personnage masculin): Liliane Berton
Wagner (baritone):Victor Autran

Conductor: André Cluytens
Orchestre & Choeurs du Théâtre National de l'Opéra
Paris, 1958

Watch videos with other singers performing De l'enfer qui vient émousser:

Libretto/Lyrics/Text/Testo:

SIEBEL, VALENTIN, WAGNER, CHŒUR
De l'enfer qui vient émousser
Nos armes
Nous ne pouvons pas repousser
Les charmes!

Tous prennent leurs épées par la lame et le present sous forme de croix à Méphistophélès.

VALENTIN
Mais puisque tu brises le fer,
Regarde! ...
C'est une croix qui, de l'enfer,
Nous garde!

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS
remettant son épée au fourneau
Nous nous retrouverons, mes amis! -
Serviteur!

FAUST
entrant
Qu'as-tu donc?

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS
Rien! - A nous deux, cher Docteur,
Qu'attendez-vous de moi?
Par où commencerai-je?

FAUST
Où se cache la belle enfant
Que ton art m'a fait voir? -
Est-ce un vain sortilège?

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS
Non pas, mais contre nous sa vertu la protège;
Et le ciel même la dèfend.

FAUST
Qu'importe? Je le veux! Viens!
Conduit-moi vers elle!
Ou je me sépare de toi.

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS
Il suffit! ... je tiens trop à mon nouvel emploi
Pour vous laisser douter un instant de mon zèle!
Attendons! ... Ici même, à ce signal joyeux,
La belle et chaste enfant va paraître à vos yeux!

English Libretto or Translation:

ALL
We cannot repulse the spells
Of hell, come to blunt our weapons!

VALENTIN
But since you can break swords ...

ALL
But since you can break swords ...

VALENTIN
Look!

ALL
Look!

VALENTIN
taking his broken sword by the blade and showing it crosswise to Mephistopheles
It is a cross which protects us from hell!

ALL
It is a cross which protects us from hell!

As he sees the cross Mephistopheles draws back. The crowd leaves the stage.

MEPHISTOPHELES
sheathing his sword
We shall meet again, friends!
Your servant!

FAUST
entering
What is wrong with you?

MEPHISTOPHELES
Nothing' Now, to the point, dear doctor,
What do you expect me to do?
What shall I begin with?

FAUST
Where is the fair girl hiding
Whom your arts showed me?
Was it mere witchcraft?

MEPHISTOPHELES
Not at all!
But her virtue defends her from us
And Heaven itself protects her!

FAUST
No matter! I want to see her!
Come! Lead me to her side
Or I shall part company with you!

MEPHISTOPHELES
Enough said! I am too keen on my new office
To let you doubt my zeal for a moment!
Let's wait! In this very spot, at this merry call,
The fair and chaste maid will come before you.